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Friday, September 26, 2014

Sprycel and My Left Lung; Who Do I Choose?

Apparently I am not the only one dealing with a hacking cough and shortness of breath, so here goes; a few weeks ago I began my yearly hacking. For some reason or another, I always seem to get a good bout of bronchitis around August, September or October; this usually occurs in conjunction with a mild case of pleural effusion.

Typically my oncologist prescribes Advair and Albuterol to help alleviate the symptoms and puts me on a Sprycel vacation, until I feel better; this usually takes a week or so. This year, since I actually have a “doctor” in town, I thought that I should go and see her, and have her assess my condition. Last week she confirmed that I had bronchitis, with reduced breath sounds in my left lung.

Being the totally thorough physician that she is, she put a pulse oximeter on my finger and walked me around her office; and then proceeded to tell me that my oxygen levels dropped significantly and that I needed to stop dancing, and go home and rest! She gave me a breathing treatment and confirmed that my breathing was “better”, so I promised to “rest” after teaching three hours of dance class that night!  She also said that if I was not better in one week, to have a chest x-ray.

Fast forward one week and I am still hacking and feeling like crap, so I get the chest x-ray. Now, I must preface this with “I LOVE Boise, and my doctor!!” Within 10 minutes of my chest x-ray, the doctor was on the phone telling me that she saw a minor effusion, but thought I might have pneumonia brewing and she wanted me to start on an antibiotic immediately.

I told her I was in the Costco parking lot and asked her if I could pick up the antibiotic there. By the time I got out of the car and walked to the pharmacy, the order was in the pharmacists hands; now that is efficiency at its’ best!

She prescribed azithromycin because of my many allergies and sensitivities, and after talking to the pharmacist, I decided to stop the Sprycel until I talked to my oncologist, as it has a moderate warning of QT prolongation, when taken at the same time.

So now the dilemma begins; I get home around 11 pm and email my oncologist; he replies at midnight that he does not believe that I have pneumonia and that she is just seeing the effusion. He agrees that I should not take the azithromycin and the Sprycel at the same time, and does not think that I need the antibiotic. I go to bed frustrated and confused! Lol

The next morning I page my oncologist to discuss my dilemma, this is how the story goes; “Michele, you did not mention having a fever, and you have had this before. I believe that you are experiencing side effects to the higher dose of Sprycel. Pleural effusion “looks” like pneumonia; I see it all of the time.”

Me: “But I do feel like crap, am coughing like crazy, and short of breath.”

Him: “Yes, that is common with effusions; they can create friction between the lung and the outer sac causing coughing, shortness of breath, etc. I can just about 100% guarantee that you do not have pneumonia, but you do need to go off of the Sprycel until these symptoms improve. I have no objection to the antibiotic; you and your doctor can decide what you feel is best regarding that, but I do not think you have pneumonia. I am afraid however,  that you may not be able to tolerate this dose of Sprycel and we may have to consider switching to Tasigna.”
Me: “Noooooooo, I will be fine on Sprycel as soon as I get over this bronchitis!”
He chuckled and then said that he wouldn't make any changes until my next appointment (in December).

So, here I once again have to decipher what is best for me; one doctor says this and the other says that. The problem is that I trust both of them and that they both have valid points; I do however believe that my oncologist has far more experience with the whole PE portion of the equation, and since I have not had fevers to indicate infection, I am leaning towards his explanation. But, with a strong desire to get over this and back on the Sprycel, I figured that since I was off the Sprycel anyway, I would go ahead and take the antibiotic as a precautionary measure. Since I am so anti-drugs; this was a difficult decision to make.

Conclusion: It has been two days off of Sprycel and two days of the 3 A’s: Azithromycin, Advair and Albuterol!  I am feeling better, but that could also be due to the fact that I am not running around or dancing and am doing little more than sitting on the couch!

Goal: To kick whatever the heck I got going on and get back on Sprycel so I can kick some more CML butt!


Oh, the dilemmas of CML….

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Cheryl Hay Earns Her Wings: Her Story

I believe that the passing of CML sister, Cheryl Hay, on September 22, 2014 (Australian time) is no coincidence. I believe that Cheryl was sent to us to inspire and motivate us with her non-stop humor, courage and optimism, and that she left this world on National CML Day for a reason. That reason being to encourage us to do everything that we can to help raise funds to find a cure for this disease. One of the goals on her Bucket List is to raise one million dollars for research; this is the first year that we have done the Night the Light Walk for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society and our goal is $1000. Next year, we have already decided that our goal is going to be $20,000.

National CML Day will never pass again without me, and hundreds around the world remembering the strong, young, optimistic, young lady that faced CML like a true warrior. She never complained and faced each and every challenge with a big smile and an even bigger dose of optimism; she shared her journey with us and taught us how to live, and die with grace.

Sharing her journey hits home to many of us that are currently living with CML; it is only natural for us to put ourselves in her shoes.  We love hearing success stories and hate hearing about battles lost; fact of the matter is that both are a reality, and that we will continue to hear stories of triumph and tragedy, for the rest of our lives.

What we can do is continue to live well, enjoy our lives’, tick off our Bucket Lists and help to raise money for a cure. We can do this in Cheryl’s honor and the honor for all of those that have also lost their battle with CML.

For those of you that are wondering, here is Cheryl’s journey, in her words:

“Just quickly for those of you whom do not know my story. I was diagnosed with CML in June 2012 and tried Glivec, Dasatanib and Nilotonib with no luck at keeping my CML under control. The TKIs either gave me nasty allergic reactions (a seizure being one!!) or just didn't work (at one point of time my PCR was 203%! The ideal range is 0.0%!!

In Sept 2013, I developed a huge swollen lymph gland in my neck and luckily my Haematologist was all over it when I saw him. After a whirlwind of days of tests he informed me that my CML was now in 'blast crisis' (it presents the same in the bone marrow biopsy as Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL). I had to commence chemo the following week. I would have chemo for 3 months and then have a Bone Marrow Transplant. There was no time to freeze my eggs beforehand so I will now no longer be able to have children. If I do not have this treatment I will die in a matter of months. Due to my uncontrolled CML journey, previous cancers, etc I am a 'high-risk patient of relapsing post BMT' Phew! Quite a lot of info to take on board!!

So originally I was meant to have BMT around Xmas, however I became very unwell with an infectious virus so it delayed treatment. Subsequently in March-another huge setback-BOTH anonymous BMT donors lined up for me FAILED THEIR MEDICAL TESTS!! What are the odds of that happening right??! So the BMT team had to re-commence a whole NEW search for a donor!
Anyway, today is the day that the process 'officially begins!' I still cannot believe after all the bumps, tears and set-backs that it is really happening!!!

Today I am having my Central Line inserted and will commence pre-BMT Chemo.

I will go to the Chemo Outpatients Department every day, up to and including Tues (when I will be admitted to hospital) Wed I have chemo but Thurs there is NONE (they call it a 'REST DAY"-sounds nice doesn't it??) MY BMT is Fri June 6th.

I'm feeling very confident about the BMT being a success against my CML. We don't receive much info about our donors obviously due to confidentiality reasons, however I do know that the donor is a young 24yr old Aussie male, and our tissue typing is a perfect 10/10 match! You cannot ask for better stats than that! Obviously I am still nervous but I am just so relieved my transplant is finally going to happen and cannot wait to beat leukaemia and be able to live life again!”

Once stating her story, Cheryl continued to share her journey; the good the bad and the ugly of it, right up until the very end; she fought long, she fought hard and now she is at rest.

There will be no more pain for Cheryl; I can only hope and pray that I have her sense of grace and peace when it is my turn.


Thank you, Cheryl; your light will continue to shine.

Please consider donating to our Light the Night Walk in Cheryl's honor.

Friday, September 19, 2014

Odd Sprycel Findings

As many of you probably remember, this past year has been no picnic! It has been filled with pain; I have had extreme pain in my back, the bottoms of my feet and in my hands. That pain sent me for an MRI and a visit with a neurologist for tons of testing; all results led to the fact that the source of my pain stemmed from side effects of Sprycel, which was no surprise to me.

Because of the pain, and two negative PCR’s my oncologist and I felt that a medication reduction was a viable option to see whether or not the reduction would reduce the pain while holding the CML at bay. Unfortunately the pain continued and my PCR rose; it went from 0% to  .432%, to  .468% in a short period of time. This resulted in an increase of my Sprycel dosage, which resulted in a better PCR of .132%.

This made me very happy, however, the party was short lived. Four weeks later my PCR crept up again to .236%. So, needless to say the roller coaster ride continues; I have recently reached the highest recommended dose of Sprycel , of 140 mg, seven days a week.

Here is the kicker! I was petrified to increase my dose of Sprycel anticipating that my pain was going to sky rocket out of control. I did not know if I would be able to handle any more pain. Guess what? After just two doses of 140mg, my pain began to subside; I gingerly continued to swallow my 140 mg tablets before bed, waking curiously, wondering whether I would be wracked with pain, or pain free.

It has now been a little over five weeks on this high dose of Sprycel and I am here to say that my pain is almost completely gone. I have not been this pain free in years, and am thrilled that there is a silver lining in my current state. I can now walk and dance, bend over and my hands are no longer falling asleep and waking me up throbbing, in the night! I am in heaven!

I find this very interesting, I was in tons MORE pain on a lower dose; I fought to lower my dose because I thought that a lower dose would mean less pain, as it turns out,  it is exactly the opposite; higher dose = less pain: Go figure!

Now, if I can just hold the pleural effusion at bay and get my PCR under control without damaging my internal organs, I will be dancing at the Light the Night Walk on October 2nd, 2014!

Keeping my fingers crossed for an excellent PCR; it will be drawn in two weeks!


Wonders never cease to amaze me….

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

No Ice Bucket Required!


Did you know that even though blood cancers have not gone “famously -pink” they have paved the way for better therapies for many types of cancer?

Did you know that collectively, blood cancers account for approximately 10% of all cancer deaths making the them second most common cause of cancer death; lung cancer being number one?

Did you know that more than one million adults, living in the US, are living with a blood cancer? And that leukemia and lymphoma account for nearly half of all childhood cancers?

And that approximately every three minutes one person in the United States is diagnosed with a blood cancer and approximately every ten minutes in the United States a person dies from a blood cancer.

The good news is that they are making great strides in the treatment of Leukemia and Lymphoma, which is also leading to breakthroughs in other cancers.

Since September is Blood Cancer Awareness Month, it is a perfect time to donate whatever you can to the continued research of blood cancers. No amount is to small and you do not even have to dump a bucket of ice water on your head!

Just think, if 100 people donated $5 (the price of one cup of Starbuck’s) one time, that would be $500 towards cancer research. If those same 100 people donated a $5, once a week, for the month of September, that would be a crazy number of ($20x100) of $2,000!! And imagine if those people “challenged” their friends to do the same!

I know it doesn’t seem like much, but honestly, every penny helps! I know that every time I donate to a good cause, it makes me feel good! And if you or a loved one is ever diagnosed with cancer, it will make you feel even better!

So please consider donating today! We are 37% of the way towards our $500 Light the Night Walk Goal. I would love to double that considering I have almost 2000 “friends” on face book, it should be a breeze!

I don’t beg often, but September is an exceptional month; it is Blood Cancer Awareness month, and I am alive because of people that have donated in the past!

Thanks in advance for however much you can spare, and are willing to donate to our Light the Night Walk Fund.


If you live in Boise, and would like to join us in our efforts, or just on the walk, please come out and take the steps that are needed to cure cancer! It will be at Ann Morrison Park, at 5 o’clock, in Boise.

Sunday, September 14, 2014

September is Blood Cancer Awareness Month: Light the Night Walk!

I have been living with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, a cancer of the blood, for the past three years and seven months. It is a journey that has led me down many paths with the most apparent and difficult path being my treatment, which is ongoing and comes with a plethora of complications which create a never ending roller coaster ride. Another path that I have traveled is the birth of my blog. My blog began as a way to educate myself and to keep my friends and family updated as to my condition and progress; it has morphed into a blog that is read worldwide, with nearly two million page views. Who knew? I never would have thought of myself as inspirational! Lol

Living with CML has also led me down a path that has allowed me the opportunity to meet many others living with the same chronic cancer; this is a blessing and a curse. The blessing part of this opportunity is the friendships that I have made near and far; when you live with a chronic cancer, with no “visible” signs of illness, most people can never grasp what living with a chronic cancer is like; knowing others with the same disease allows us to relate to each other in a manner that no one else would understand. The curse part of this path is the blatant fact that people die; people that you have gotten to know and share a very raw bond with; die. It is a painstaking reality that none of us, ever get used to.




This leads me to my favorite path; the path of helping others; since September is National Blood Cancer Awareness Month, I have collected Lego's for ill children at St. Luke’s Hospital, in Boise, for the past two years. It is my way of giving back to the small warriors that are battling this, and other diseases. Brick's 4 the Brave: Put a Smile on a Child's Face!

This year, Joe and I have also decided to walk in the Light the Night Walk, for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s yearly fundraiser. I have never participated in a fundraiser, other than the Lego’s in my life, so I am not really sure how to go about it, so I am throwing it out there; no donation is too small. I would love to be able to raise $1000 to help find a cure, not only for me and my friends, but for anyone that currently has, or will someday be diagnosed with a blood cancer.

Also, if you live in Boise, and you would like, you can join us on our walk and join our team. The walk is on Thursday, October 2, 2014, at Ann Morrison Park. I will hopefully have more details than this, soon.

So, if you are so inclined, please visit my Light the Night Walk Team Page and donate and join our team; Dancing My Way Through Leukemia! Joe and I will be walking for me and my friend from Australia, Cheryl Hay who is reaching the end of her journey.

Lego’s can either be brought to a local dance, or mailed directly to me; Amazon is super easy, just be sure to add your name to the gift card, so that I can give you a great big thanks!

Michele Tschirhart
83 Falcon Dr
Boise, Idaho 83716





Thursday, September 11, 2014

Bricks 4 the Brave: Put a Smile on a Child's Face!


As many of you already know, I was diagnosed with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) on February 9, 2011. It has been a three and a half years and life has been full of twists and turns, ups and downs, goods and bads! I have been diligently following my oncologist’s treatment plan and am making progress. It isn't always easy, but somehow I make it all work!

Living with Leukemia has definitely encouraged me to look at life a little differently; I feel more blessed each and every day and understand that every day is a gift. It does not take much to brighten the day of another person; sometimes it only takes a smile or a touch.

Since September is National Leukemia Awareness month, I thought it was the perfect time to put a smile on the face of a child, that is suffering from Leukemia. Bricks 4 the Brave is an organization that is based purely on volunteer participation. The hospital that will be receiving the Legos is St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital, in Boise, Idaho.

Please help me to honor and humor these brave little warriors with a set of Legos. Legos will help them pass the many hours of isolation that they often spend in treatment. Many of the children that are diagnosed with Leukemia will undergo a bone marrow transplant which is a lengthy process that leaves them often alone, with no distraction; Lego's will help! The “cure” rate of children with leukemia is generally higher than it is for adults; Thank God. But ask any child that has leukemia and they will be certain to tell you that their treatment  is no “walk in the park”!

You may enjoy becoming “fan” of “The Leukemia Slayer”; Jacob. Jacob is an inspiration to any and all that have managed to find a way into his world. He has battled Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) since December 2, 2010 and recently reached the end of his treatment. (March of 2014.) Of course, he is still dealing issues from his treatment: but continues to help so many others.  Please stop by and become a fan; you will be glad that you did!

Anyway, back to Legos for Leukemia; there are three easy was you can join me.
         1.       Purchase a set of Legos and either drop it off, or mail it to me.       
         2.       Purchase a gift card from either Walmart or Target and mail it to me; I will shop for you!
         3.       Shop at Amazon and have your choice sent directly to me; many of the Lego sets offer Prime Shipping    at no charge. I put a few suggestions here: Legos for Leukemia

As you can see, shopping online would probably be the easiest way for you to join my Legos for Leukemia drive. The kids and I appreciate all of you donations!

Thank you, in advance: 
Michele
Please send Legos to:
Michele Tschirhart
83 Falcon Dr
Boise, Idaho 83716

Monday, September 8, 2014

Death and Dying; It is OK to feel Sad

For the better part of my life, my “friends” were people that I met within the vicinity of where I lived. They were people that I met through common interests; people that I saw at the grocery store, the mailbox, the park or even at the doctor’s office. Today, much of that has changed; because of the internet, I have made friends with common interests, all around the world.

As luck would have it, some of my dearest friends have been become so, by sharing a very rare cancer; chronic myelogenous leukemia. For those of us that have found each other in various groups, this blood cancer doesn't seem all that rare, because all of us have it. Truth be told, there are only approximately 75,000 people in the United States, living with CML; when you compare that to the approximate population in the US of 313.9 million people, we really are a drop in the bucket.

This being said, it is not uncommon for those of us in CML “groups” to experience the death of a friend. The past few months have been particularly brutal in that department; we all have lost quite a few blood buddies. Right now, my focus is on my friend, Cheryl Hay. I “met” Cheryl almost two years ago,and was immediately drawn to her wit, her sense of humor and her tenacity; this coupled with the fact that she lives in Australia and has a most fabulous accent, made her extra special, in my book and we quickly became “friends.”

Unfortunately, Cheryl’s CML journey has not been an easy one; her CML quickly progressed into Blast Crisis, and a bone marrow transplant was her only option for survival. I shall not delve into her medical details, except to say that Cheryl did indeed receive bone marrow transplant; but unfortunately, despite her optimistic spirit, her valiant fight and tenacity, she has lost this war.

She never gave up, yet Cheryl is dying; and in typical Cheryl fashion, she has accepted her fate with grace and strength. She is at peace with her prognosis and even states in jest, that eventually there will be “no more suffering for Cheryl.” She said that she was glad that she “traveled the world when she did, and went bungee jumping, sky diving, etc.”

Where does this leave us?

Vulnerable, sad and a bit lost.

It leaves us with aching hearts, and that is OK. It is alright to feel sad, it is alright to be angry that Cheryl has traveled an extremely bumpy road, and did not reach the crest of the hilltop. It is ok to feel these things; it is normal, so allow the tears to fall, allow yourself to feel sad, but don’t forget to add laughter to your tears, because believe me, that is what Cheryl would want.

And while we are on the subject of aching hearts, my heart not only aches for Cheryl, but aches even deeper for her parents. Her parents are the warriors that will be left behind; they are the warriors that are standing by their daughter’s side; helpless, unable to do anything except comfort her, be there for her and pray that her suffering is minimal, and ends quickly. I cannot imagine their pain and I wish that there was some way, to ease their sadness and devastation.

Cheryl’s dying leaves those of us living with CML, with another hole in our heart; another taken too soon from this disease. We all have so many questions, fears and concerns; but those can wait. Right now all we can do is hold Cheryl close in our hearts and pray that she is pain free, and able to complete her bucket list, which mostly seems to consist of visiting with family and friends, and saying Good Bye; Cheryl is one amazing woman, let’s pray that she will be well enough to do so!

Now, to help many of you that are struggling with Cheryl’s dying, and her self-professed peace, I am going to tell you a story: it is a personal story that allows me a snippet of a glimpse, of how I believe that Cheryl may now be feeling.

A decade-ish ago, I had surgery to remove ovarian tumors; I was forewarned that the recovery was going to be brutal, and it was. I developed an infection several days post op and was near death; the hospital staff even had a student nurse in my room around the clock, monitoring my every breath and encouraging me to fight. What I remember from this time was being so sick, that all I wanted was to be left in my own little world; I did not wish to return to the real world.


The world that I had fallen into was a world that engulfed me in a way that sheltered me from my pain; I remember feeling completely at peace and utterly calm, and wished only to exist in that world. I swear that it was either angels or the Heavenly Father Himself, which wrapped their arms around me, and held me tight. I felt no fear and had lost that innate sense of fighting for survival; I was at peace, and was comfortable with dying. I did not have any regrets or any unfulfilled wishes; I was calm, accepting and very much, I believe,  right where Cheryl is, right now; simply at peace.

I know that this may be difficult to comprehend, as sometimes it is hard for me to even look back and remember, but I truly believe that those of us that will knowingly face our own deaths’ will have nothing to fear. We will be able to face death with the faith, courage, strength and grace that our dear friend is currently, and graciously allowing us to witness.

Cheryl Hay is a warrior that has allowed us to share her journey; the good, the bad and the ugly and I am honored to have been a witness to this incredible, beautiful woman’s life.

Thank you Cheryl for the laughs, the love and the strength which you have shared; I shall carry your grace and faith with me, all of my days; May God Bless you, and hold you close during your final journey.


You rocked it, sister! I am proud to be your friend!


Saturday, September 6, 2014

Riding the PCR Roller Coaster!

Living with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia is nothing short of a roller coaster ride; it is full of ups and downs. Most days I meet these challenges with a smile on my face, a stomp in my step and a bit of stubbornness in my attitude.

Yesterday, there were a few tears thrown into the mix; I received my latest PCR result of .28% on the International Scale, which was a huge disappointment after having a .134% results two months prior. This year has proved to be a bit of a challenge, in the PCR department.

I started out the year with two negative PCR’s which led to a decrease in the dose of Sprycel, all the way down to 70mg. The main reason for the decrease in medication was due to the increased pain that I was constantly in. The pain was so severe (back pain and peripheral neuropathy in my feet, hands and legs) that I was sent for MRI’s, Nerve Conduction Studies, Electromyograms and a plethora of blood work; all of these tests were negative, thus correlating the pain to Sprycel.

Oddly enough the pain continued regardless of the decrease in medication; the only thing that did not remain, was my negative PCR. My PCR literally jumped from a negative state to .432%; not only was I shocked, I felt terribly deflated. I felt as though I had failed my body once again. I felt as though I had once again lost hold of the grip, which I had on CML.

I believe that after three and a half years, the realization that CML is just an unpredictable cancer has finally sunk in. I believe that I am at the point of acceptance; I accept that fact that I cannot control this disease; I can only follow the advice of my oncologist and pray for good results. I can eat well, exercise, get enough rest, take my medication, pray and then deal with the PCR results, as they come.

I cannot become impatient, or dwell on the uphill battles; I must enjoy the ride, for it is the ride that I am on, even though I did not choose to purchase the ticket! I must allow myself moments of sadness and frustration from time to time, as this is only normal, but once those moments pass, I must pick up my boots straps and get back in the front car of that coaster, and hang on for the ride!


Suck it, CML! You may mess with my blood, but you shall not mess with my soul!

Monday, September 1, 2014

National Leukemia Awareness Month; Help Me Collect Bricks for the Brave!!!


As many of you already know, I was diagnosed with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) on February 9, 2011. It has been a year and a half since that diagnosis and life has been full of twists and turns, ups and downs, goods and bads! I have been diligently following my oncologist’s treatment plan and am making progress.

Living with Leukemia has definitely encouraged me to look at life a little differently; I feel more blessed each and every day and understand that every day is a gift. It does not take much to brighten the day of another person; sometimes it only takes a smile or a touch.

Since September is National Leukemia Awareness month, I thought it was the perfect time to put a smile on the face of a child, that is suffering from Leukemia. Bricks 4 the Brave is an organization that is based purely on volunteer participation. The hospital that will be receiving the Legos : Bricks 4 the Brave is St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital, in Boise, Idaho.

Please help me to honor and humor these brave little warriors with a set of Legos. Legos will help them pass the many hours of isolation that these kids spend waiting for and then recovering from a bone marrow transplant. Many children that are diagnosed with Leukemia will receive a bone marrow transplant. The “cure” rate of children with leukemia is generally higher than it is for adults; Thank God. But ask any child that has leukemia and they will be certain to tell you that the treatment to cure them is no “walk in the park”!

You may want to become a “fan” of “The Leukemia Slayer”; Jacob. Jacob is an inspiration to any and all that have managed to find a way into his world. He has been battling Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) since December 2, 2010 and completed treatment in March of 2014; Go Jacob!!!. Please stop by and become a fan; you will be glad that you did!



Anyway, back to Bricks 4 the Brave; there are three easy was you can join me.

         1.       Purchase a set of Legos and either drop it off, or mail it to me.       
         2.       Purchase a gift card from either Walmart or Target and mail it to me; I will shop for you!
         3.       Shop at Amazon and have your choice sent directly to me; many of the Lego sets offer Prime Shipping    at no charge. I put a few suggestions here: Legos .

As you can see, shopping online would probably be the easiest way for you to join my Bricks 4 the Brave drive. The kids and I appreciate all of you donations!

Thank you, in advance: 
Michele
Please send Legos to:
Michele Tschirhart
83 Falcon Dr
Boise, Idaho 83716

Bricks for the Brave!!